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What are the ranges of frequencies of RAM supported by TravelMate P259-G2-MG?

GajalShankarGajalShankar Member Posts: 106 Die Hard
Specs - (Intel i5-7200U CPU + 500 GB Nvme SSD)
and Currently, I have 8GB DDR4 2400 Mhz(Single Channel), and I want to add one single 1x8GB RAM to another slot.
Here are the results from speccy describes I have one slot available for upgrade also I checked on Acer site (it is expandable up to 32GB)

Unlike desktops, mostly SO-DIMM Based RAM(Non -ECC and Unbuffered/Register) are generally supported in notebooks.
As DDR4 2400Mhz is already supported it seems there won't be a problem to upgrade DDR4 2666MHz while upgrading but to clarify
Will my laptop support 2666Mhz without causing any compatibility heating issues?
Here are some listed I searched for
https://www.amazon.in/Kingston-Technology-HyperX-2666MHz-HX426S15IB2/dp/B01N7K4CEU/ref=sr_1_5?dchild=1&keywords=8gb+ram+for+laptop&qid=1595620125&s=computers&sr=1-5

https://www.amazon.in/Crucial-CT8G4SFS8266-Unbuffered-SODIMM-Retail/dp/B071KNKBQ1/ref=sr_1_8?dchild=1&keywords=8gb+ram+for+laptop&qid=1595620125&s=computers&sr=1-8



Best Answer

  • aphanicaphanic Member Posts: 959 Seasoned Specialist
    Answer ✓
    I'll try to be succinct, not to add to the confusion.

    The memory controller nowadays lay in the processor itself, not in the motherboard, that's why the specifications for the processor (when talking about Intel) are as accurate as they can be, without overclocking (overclocking the memory in laptops is a no-no because it implies hacking its firmware too).

    I very much doubt Acer overclocked the memory controller for that particular machine during manufacturing, it is possible, but I find it unlikely. It is wasy to see though, CPU-Z is capable of showing in a semi-real time manner (it polls ever X seconds) at which frequency the RAM is running. So does HWiNFO if that program is more to your liking.

    Fire it up, you'll see the DRAM frequency alternating states, based on whether the computer is used or not, it's saving energy by running slower. For example, mine is resting at this moment so it downclocked:



    If you do something, even if it is not as intensive as running Prime95 with large FFTs, you'll see that value ramp up, but my assumption is that it won't ever get past 1066.5-ish, which means the RAM is effectively running at 2133 MHz (double that). That would be because of the limit I talked about, because Intel chose 2133 MHz, to be the expected DDR4 frequency for non-soldered RAM for that processor. Mine is 2666 MHz:



    There are times, in which because of shortage of components, or others being cheaper, faster graded RAM is put in a computer. For example a friend of mine had his A515-54G shipped with DDR4-3200 RAM. It worked, because the chip had a profile for running at 2133 MHz, but that's it, it won't be getting past that.

    What's more, if you were after specialty RAM, performance-oriente RAM, they normally state the timings of the RAM for the speed it is rated at. They won't tell you the timings for 2133 MHz in my chip for example, even when it can and will run in a computer that only expect that, so it gets complicated comparing if you were looking for performance.

    Look at the profiles of my RAM for example:



    This 16 GB stick would work in your computer without a doubt, even though it is DDR4-2666 and it has 4 profile for running at that frequency (probably to accommodate, or play nice with other, less performant chips), it has 2 profiles for DDR4-2133 (starting from the bottom the two that list frequency being 1067 MHz. Hell it would even run in a machine expecting DDR4-1866!

    But do you see those timings? (and those are but a few) They generally advertise the best ones and for the memory speed the RAM is rated at. In this case, they advertised it as DDR4-2666 CL15 (15-17-17-35).

    And that's my whole reasoning for which RAM stick(s) to choose, knowing your limits, getting higher than that is something I'd only do if it's cheaper as it won't be going any faster than the limit.

    I hope I didn't contribute to the confusion, but shed some light on it :S
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FAQ & Answers

  • billseybillsey ACE Posts: 25,419 Trailblazer
    The answer is pretty much "No". I believe that the DDR4 memory allows you to downclock, so the 2666 module will work, but it will run at the 2400 speed the chipset is designed for. You are better off matching the existing memory and run in dual channel mode at 2400.
    Click on "Like" if you find my answer useful or click on "Yes" if it answers your question.
  • GajalShankarGajalShankar Member Posts: 106 Die Hard
    edited July 2020
    So Is there any kind of benefit on running 2666MHz RAM downclocked to 2400Mhz or Shall I go for 2400Mhz?
    In any case, please suggest me which one to buy as I don't know about the availability of the exact model of RAM I have currently having. 
  • aphanicaphanic Member Posts: 959 Seasoned Specialist
    This thread ought to give you some insight on the whole matter: https://community.acer.com/en/discussion/608352/guide-how-to-find-out-if-you-can-upgrade-the-ram-and-which-one-you-need

    Answering the question you have, no, there's no benefit of installing 2666 MHz RAM if it's going to be clocked at 2400 MHz or less; aside from the monetary benefit if it costs less.
  • StevenGenStevenGen ACE Posts: 4,819 Pathfinder

    Your TravelMate P259-G2-MG can take a max mem of 32GB it has 2x slots (2 banks of 1) and comes OEM with 8GB removable ram. It can take a range of ram from DDR4-2400 SODIMM and DDR4-2666 SODIMM to DDR4-3200 SODIMM. It also has a storage drive form factor of M.2 SATA 3 - 6Gb/s 3D NAND M.2 Type 2280 Internal SSD. See this Crucial site recommendation of both ram and M.2 ssd for a guidance of what you can put into your TravelMate P259-G2-MG here: https://www.crucial.com/compatible-upgrade-for/acer/travelmate-p259-mg.


  • StevenGenStevenGen ACE Posts: 4,819 Pathfinder
    edited July 2020
    Specs - (Intel i5-7200U CPU + 500 GB Nvme SSD)
    and Currently, I have 8GB DDR4 2400 Mhz(Single Channel), and I want to add one single 1x8GB RAM to another slot.
    Here are the results from speccy describes I have one slot available for upgrade also I checked on Acer site (it is expandable up to 32GB)

    Unlike desktops, mostly SO-DIMM Based RAM(Non -ECC and Unbuffered/Register) are generally supported in notebooks.
    As DDR4 2400Mhz is already supported it seems there won't be a problem to upgrade DDR4 2666MHz while upgrading but to clarify
    Will my laptop support 2666Mhz without causing any compatibility heating issues?
    Here are some listed I searched for
    https://www.amazon.in/Kingston-Technology-HyperX-2666MHz-HX426S15IB2/dp/B01N7K4CEU/ref=sr_1_5?dchild=1&keywords=8gb+ram+for+laptop&qid=1595620125&s=computers&sr=1-5

    https://www.amazon.in/Crucial-CT8G4SFS8266-Unbuffered-SODIMM-Retail/dp/B071KNKBQ1/ref=sr_1_8?dchild=1&keywords=8gb+ram+for+laptop&qid=1595620125&s=computers&sr=1-8



    Also, if you combine a DDR4-2400 in one slot with a DDR4-2666 in the second slot then your ram will run at DDR4-2400 speed and adding DDR4-2666 will NOT make the ram run at 266MHz as the ram will run to its lowest denominator speed and you will be waiting your money with the more expensive DDR4-2666. Try to match the ram with the same timings and always the ame speed and preferably the same manufacturer, as that is the only way that you will get “Dual Channel” mode for you ram e.g. and the max is a kit of matching timing, speed and manufacturer like 2x 16Gb DDR4-3200 SODIMM kit, that will give you the best result for a total of 32GB. Will my laptop support 2666 MHz without causing any compatibility heating issues? That depends room temps and of how hard you push your TravelMate P259-G2-MG e.g. gaming and what demanding software you have, the most and best way is to cool your laptop with a laptop cooler as to reduce temps.

    Your TravelMate P259-G2-MG can take a max mem of 32GB it has 2x slots (2 banks of 1) and comes OEM with 8GB-DDR4-2400 removable ram.

    The TravelMate P259-G2-MG can take a range of ram from DDR4-2400 SODIMM and DDR4-2666 SODIMM to DDR4-3200 SODIMM. It also has a storage drive form factor of M.2 SATA 3 - 6Gb/s 3D NAND M.2 Type 2280 Internal SSD. See the “Crucial” site recommendation of both ram and M.2 ssd’s for a guidance of what you can put into your TravelMate P259-G2-MG here: https://www.crucial.com/compatible-upgrade-for/acer/travelmate-p259-mg


  • aphanicaphanic Member Posts: 959 Seasoned Specialist
    I'm sorry but the Crucial site is inaccurate or rather incomplete, it may be able to recommend sticks of DDR4-3200 for a Travelmate P259-G2-MG for example, but it's only because the memory has a profile for running at DDR4-2133 (quite common to have profiles for that speed).

    Since @GajalShankar gave us the model of the processor his laptop has, we know its memory controller only runs DDR4 memory at 2133 MHz unless overclocked. And memory overclocking is not something you can do out of the box on a laptop, it requires hacking its BIOS at the very least.

    As I said in the guide, any module that also has a profile for what your processor expects may run, even if it is rated for higher clock speeds, but it won't be running past the max the processor expects. For example, since you have DDR4-2400 installed @GajalShankar, if you open CPU-Z and go to the memory tab I bet you won't be seeing its DRAM frequency going to 1200 even if you do things that are taxing for the memory, it'll stay at 1066 at max.

    Therefore, I'd only get DDR4-2133+ memory if it were cheaper than DDR4-2133.
  • billseybillsey ACE Posts: 25,419 Trailblazer
    There are so many answers here it's getting confusing. :( As stated early on, the P259-G2-MG model with the 7th gen CPU runs it's memory at 2400MHz so unless it's cheaper to buy faster memory, buy the 2400...
    Click on "Like" if you find my answer useful or click on "Yes" if it answers your question.
  • GajalShankarGajalShankar Member Posts: 106 Die Hard
    edited July 2020
    First of all, thank you for so many comments.
    I got confused and didn't know whom I should give "yes" that answered my question billsey , aphanic or StevenGen ?😅😅
                                             ****************-----------------By StevenGen-------------------------****************
    I need little clarification as I too read the same on crucial website (this became the foremost reason to ask this question) as StevenGen said:

    Your TravelMate P259-G2-MG can take a max mem of 32GB it has 2x slots (2 banks of 1) and comes OEM with 8GB removable ram. It can take a range of ram from DDR4-2400 SODIMM and DDR4-2666 SODIMM to DDR4-3200 SODIMM. It also has a storage drive form factor of M.2 SATA 3 - 6Gb/s 3D NAND M.2 Type 2280 Internal SSD. See this Crucial site recommendation of both ram and M.2 ssd for a guidance of what you can put into your TravelMate P259-G2-MG here: https://www.crucial.com/compatible-upgrade-for/acer/travelmate-p259-mg.


    StevenGen you also said if I keep 1x8GB DDR4 2400MHz in 1st slot(as it is now) and go for 1x 8GB DDR4-3200 SODIMM kit in 2nd slot, then dual-channel will work on based on lower threshold, i.e. 2400Mhz and if I go for 2x16GB 3200MHz then only It can achieve up to 3200Mhz. Cool, I got it. 
    Let's say I have (1x8GB DDR4 2400Mhz in 1st slot and 1x8GB DDR4 3100MHz in 2nd slot)
    Ques) Can I disable slower RAM from the BIOS itself so that whenever I want more performance than more amount of RAM I can simply disable slower one? (using one at a time that way we can achieve 3200Mhz playing with the tradeoffs)
    If yes then Since I use hibernation frequently will there be an issue in transferring RAM data from HDD back to the different Speed RAM?😅

                                    ****************-----------------By aphanic-------------------------****************
    Considering Next possibility, what aphanic said that crucial website is inaccurate, also proved by that intel spec sheet that processor i5-7200U can only support max up to 2133MHz. https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/95443/intel-core-i5-7200u-processor-3m-cache-up-to-3-10-ghz.html

    Thanks for sharing his helpful post aphanic 
    https://community.acer.com/en/discussion/608352/guide-how-to-find-out-if-you-can-upgrade-the-ram-and-which-one-you-need
    But as you stated earlier that it could support max upto 2133Mhz so this post signifies
    As aphanic said in the guide, any module that also has a profile for what your processor expects may run, even if it is rated for higher clock speeds, but it won't be running past the max the processor expects. For example, since you have DDR4-2400 installed @GajalShankar, if you open CPU-Z and go to the memory tab I bet you won't be seeing its DRAM frequency going to 1200 even if you do things that are taxing for the memory, it'll stay at 1066 at max.
    Therefore, I'd only get DDR4-2133+ memory if it were cheaper than DDR4-2133.
     It means ultimately, it is going to be downclocked to a certain threshold since the memory controller is not compatible for more than that. 🤔
    <b>Understood,&nbsp;but how real-life scenario can be justified like If we try to push hardly my filling the RAM and swap space excessively or video editing then also it will reach to a certain limit like 2400Mhz RAM to some 1400Mhz?<br></b><b>Also, you are trying to say it's just a marketing term or it can go beyond only in the cases of desktop.<br></b><b>Correct me if I went wrong</b>
                   ****************------------------By billsey------------------------****************
    I guess you are more experienced, can you answer these lame questions?
    1. You mean to say there be misinformation by Crucial(manufacturer) and Intel(foundry) about the specifications? 
    2.billsey said:
    There are so many answers here it's getting confusing. :( As stated early on, the P259-G2-MG model with the 7th gen CPU runs it's memory at 2400MHz so unless it's cheaper to buy faster memory, buy the 2400...
    As 2133Mhz is the max limit, then the only reason Acer has given 2400MHz RAM is that they were getting 2400 Mhz RAM cheaper than 2133Mhz for the same storage capacity?
    3.No matter what the speed of the RAM is, it always works at a comparatively lower clock speed than actual as aphanic  said.

    Please Help me to decide what's the conclusion is -
    Guys, please don't think I'm wasting time by asking unnecessary questions I'm just curious to know.
    I hope the next comment will give a fair and reasonable answer keeping all the points discussed.


  • aphanicaphanic Member Posts: 959 Seasoned Specialist
    Answer ✓
    I'll try to be succinct, not to add to the confusion.

    The memory controller nowadays lay in the processor itself, not in the motherboard, that's why the specifications for the processor (when talking about Intel) are as accurate as they can be, without overclocking (overclocking the memory in laptops is a no-no because it implies hacking its firmware too).

    I very much doubt Acer overclocked the memory controller for that particular machine during manufacturing, it is possible, but I find it unlikely. It is wasy to see though, CPU-Z is capable of showing in a semi-real time manner (it polls ever X seconds) at which frequency the RAM is running. So does HWiNFO if that program is more to your liking.

    Fire it up, you'll see the DRAM frequency alternating states, based on whether the computer is used or not, it's saving energy by running slower. For example, mine is resting at this moment so it downclocked:



    If you do something, even if it is not as intensive as running Prime95 with large FFTs, you'll see that value ramp up, but my assumption is that it won't ever get past 1066.5-ish, which means the RAM is effectively running at 2133 MHz (double that). That would be because of the limit I talked about, because Intel chose 2133 MHz, to be the expected DDR4 frequency for non-soldered RAM for that processor. Mine is 2666 MHz:



    There are times, in which because of shortage of components, or others being cheaper, faster graded RAM is put in a computer. For example a friend of mine had his A515-54G shipped with DDR4-3200 RAM. It worked, because the chip had a profile for running at 2133 MHz, but that's it, it won't be getting past that.

    What's more, if you were after specialty RAM, performance-oriente RAM, they normally state the timings of the RAM for the speed it is rated at. They won't tell you the timings for 2133 MHz in my chip for example, even when it can and will run in a computer that only expect that, so it gets complicated comparing if you were looking for performance.

    Look at the profiles of my RAM for example:



    This 16 GB stick would work in your computer without a doubt, even though it is DDR4-2666 and it has 4 profile for running at that frequency (probably to accommodate, or play nice with other, less performant chips), it has 2 profiles for DDR4-2133 (starting from the bottom the two that list frequency being 1067 MHz. Hell it would even run in a machine expecting DDR4-1866!

    But do you see those timings? (and those are but a few) They generally advertise the best ones and for the memory speed the RAM is rated at. In this case, they advertised it as DDR4-2666 CL15 (15-17-17-35).

    And that's my whole reasoning for which RAM stick(s) to choose, knowing your limits, getting higher than that is something I'd only do if it's cheaper as it won't be going any faster than the limit.

    I hope I didn't contribute to the confusion, but shed some light on it :S
  • GajalShankarGajalShankar Member Posts: 106 Die Hard
    edited July 2020
    As you said 
    There are times, in which because of shortage of components, or others being cheaper, faster graded RAM is put in a computer. For example a friend of mine had his A515-54G shipped with DDR4-3200 RAM. It worked, because the chip had a profile for running at 2133 MHz, but that's it, it won't be getting past that.

    considering overclocking has never been applied as it is restricted in notebooks

    If the chip your friend had a profile of running at 2133Mhz just as mine. Also, DDR4 3200Mhz RAM worked but was he getting downclocked to 1600MHz/1330.5MHz or only up to 1066.5Mhz?

  • aphanicaphanic Member Posts: 959 Seasoned Specialist
    edited July 2020
    His machine was running just like mine, his DDR4-3200 stick was behaving as if it were a DDR4-2666, never using higher profiles.

    It would downclock to save power when not needed, but that's done automatically and nothing to worry about; the thing is that it never, ever, got past DDR4-2666. Put in other words, the DRAM Frequency CPU-Z reports never got past 1330 MHz.
  • GajalShankarGajalShankar Member Posts: 106 Die Hard
    Cool.
    But my DDR4-2400Mhz stick is behaving poorly that way as it is never going beyond 1066.5 Mhz 
    Why Shouldn't it reach till 1200Mhz?
    Here are all the screenshots merged in one image

  • aphanicaphanic Member Posts: 959 Seasoned Specialist
    edited July 2020
    It's not behaving poorly, that's what I'm trying to say all along, it's working as expected. The stick itself is able to work at 2400 MHz, but your processor and the memory controller are the ones limiting the clock speed of the memory to 2133 MHz.

    You can put a DDR4-3200 stick in there, it will never get past 1065-ish (2133 MHz when doubled) much less 1600 because of the same reason, hence my recommendation to aim for DDR4-2133 memory primarily, but if there are cheaper RAM that's rated for higher speeds it will possibly be compatible too if it's capable of running at DDR4-2133 and the memory controller will make sure of that. It's the one choosing so to speak.

    I may have to revisit the memory guide if that isn't conveyed clearly :scream:

    EDIT: Let's do something, run Thaiphoon (disregard the warning at its start, that's for overclocking and it's prohibited in the firmware) on it and list the profiles your memory has:




  • GajalShankarGajalShankar Member Posts: 106 Die Hard
    No, I understood the only reason I asked you because your friend was getting 1330Mhz (for 3200Mhz RAM behaving as 2666MHz) even the processor he had, having a limited profile for running at 2133 MHz at max.
    But I'm getting 1066.5Mhz (for 2400Mhz behaving as 2133Mhz) even the processor I have limited profile for running at 2133 MHz at max.
    The stick itself is able to work at 2400 MHz, but your processor and the memory controller are the ones limiting the clock speed of the memory to 2133 MHz.

    What's the catch here(is it only due to memory controller)?

  • GajalShankarGajalShankar Member Posts: 106 Die Hard

    This is the output using 
    Thaiphoon Burner 16.3.0.3 Build 0702
  • aphanicaphanic Member Posts: 959 Seasoned Specialist
    GajalShankar said:
    What's the catch here(is it only due to memory controller)?
    Pretty much, there are more things to take into consideration of course (higher speeds, greater heat maybe), but it was all done during the design/manufacturing of the processor.

    It is certainly possible to overclock the memory controller to accept and work with RAM at speedier clocks, but it's out of the question (not only it's against ACUA, I wouldn't go there in a laptop).

    No, I understood the only reason I asked you because your friend was getting 1330Mhz (for 3200Mhz RAM behaving as 2666MHz) even the processor he had, having a limited profile for running at 2133 MHz at max.
    Running at 2666 MHz max, we both have an i7 10510U and that's what it expects; but yep, that's the thing, for RAM clock speeds it all boils down to what the processor and the memory controller wants.

    When you see the frequencies being half it is because the first D of DDR stands for double, which may be confusing but you get the drift.
  • aphanicaphanic Member Posts: 959 Seasoned Specialist
    This is the output using 
    Thaiphoon Burner 16.3.0.3 Build 0702
    And there it is, your RAM is probably running in the profile I highlighted below (or the one above), but none above those:


  • GajalShankarGajalShankar Member Posts: 106 Die Hard
    aphanic said:
    No, I understood the only reason I asked you because your friend was getting 1330Mhz (for 3200Mhz RAM behaving as 2666MHz) even the processor he had, having a limited profile for running at 2133 MHz at max.
    Running at 2666 MHz max, we both have an i7 10510U and that's what it expects; but yep, that's the thing, for RAM clock speeds it all boils down to what the processor and the memory controller wants.

    When you see the frequencies being half it is because the first D of DDR stands for double, which may be confusing but you get the drift.
    Who are we - you and your friend?

    This line was only the part of ambiguity here
    -A515-54g shipped with DDR4-3200Mhz RAM. It worked because chip had a profile for running at 2133Mhz where the processor you said is i7 10510U?
  • GajalShankarGajalShankar Member Posts: 106 Die Hard
    edited July 2020
    😅The only reason for the confusion - you didn't tell the processor of your friend earlier there I assumed that he had a processor with only 2133Mhz just like me
    which is not the case he has the same processor as you which can operate at your speed 2666Mhz i.e 1330Mhz
  • aphanicaphanic Member Posts: 959 Seasoned Specialist
    edited July 2020
    Oh! No, sorry man 😳, we both have the same machine an Acer A515-54G-70Y9, it comes with the i7 10510U so DDR4-2666 is the maximum for us, that was a typo of mine 😳😳😳.
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